PeaceWeavers

Be sure to check back each month for another PeaceWeaver article from Dr. Karen Bullock.
[You may also access archived articles at Pathway Ministries.]
C. S. Lewis: In the Solitude . . . God
November 26th, 2022
Clive Staples Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963) was born in Belfast, in Ulster, Ireland, the second son of Albert James and Florence Augusta Hamilton Lewis. His mother was the daughter and great-granddaughter of priests, and his elder brother Warren, or Warnie, was his best chum. As a babe, he was baptized by his mother's father in St. Mark's Church, Dundela. He named himself when he was...
Hilda of Whitby
November 12th, 2022
Early Church Father Ambrose reports that Easter in 387 was observed in Gaul (France) on 21 March, in Italy on 18 April, and in Alexandria, Egypt, on 25 April. From the 4th century onward, factions of the Church debated the proper dating of Easter. It took a great deal of diplomacy to handle these matters. Hilda of Whitby, a princess and Abbess of a famous monastery, negotiated this very question i...
John and Mary Williams: Polynesia's Messengers of Peace
September 9th, 2022
If one takes the A10 road north from London, and drives through Stoke Newington, Stamford Hall, and Seven Sisters, one will come next to Tottenham, which was a tiny village in the late 18th century and home to the Williams family. John was born in June of 1796 to parents devoted to God. He was a good student in grade-school and, in 1810 at fourteen years old, was apprenticed for seven years to Eno...
“Sir Great Heart” of Texas Baptists
September 9th, 2022
The wagon creaked slowly, trundling its way through an East Texas pine forest in the summer of 1859. Overhead, the towering trees swayed in the light breeze and provided dappling shade from the oppressive sun. The twenty- six year-old, Tennessee-born-pastor, Robert Cooke Buckner (1833-1919), did not mind the heat. He and his soul-mate wife, Vienna, and their two little girls, were headed west in s...
The “Famine Pots” of Ireland
May 25th, 2022
In 1845, the population of Ireland numbered almost eight million. The Irish were an industrious, hardy people, exporting to England their livestock, peas, beans, onions, rabbits, salmon, oysters, herring, lard, honey and even potatoes. However, when the Irish potato crop failed that year and the next, large parts of the population, particularly in the west of Ireland, were left destitute. Irish Qu...
Elisabeth Schmitz of Berlin: Conscience of the Church
May 25th, 2022
On 9-10 November 1938, Nazis in Germany torched synagogues, vandalized Jewish homes, schools and businesses, and killed almost 100 Jews. In the aftermath of what was called Kristallnacht, or the “Night of Broken Glass,” some 30,000 Jewish men were arrested and sent to Nazi concentration camps. German Jews had been subjected to repressive policies since 1933, when Nazi Party leader Adolf Hitler (18...
James Henry Rushbrooke: Baptist Champion of Peace
May 25th, 2022
“Peace” seemed to be the middle name of the babe born that sunny day in Bethnal Green, east London, on 29 July 1870. Son of devout Anglican parents, James Henry Rushbrooke was brilliant, thoughtful, and became known as a careful reconciler of differences, even as a child. When James was fifteen years old, he began attending Westbourne Park Chapel with his aunt each Sunday and soon made a professio...
George W. Carver: “African American Leonardo”
May 25th, 2022
In the year 1864, on a 240 acre farm near Diamond Grove, Missouri, George was born to his mother Mary and father Giles. He had a sister and a younger brother too, and they were all enslaved by Moses and Susan Carver. When George was an infant, his father died. He and his mother were then kidnapped by rustlers and resold in a neighboring state. Mary was never seen again, but George, small and frail...
Mickey Leland: Flying into the Storm to Help
May 25th, 2022
It is generally held that Mickey Leland was one of the most effective spokespersons for hungry people in the 20th century. How did this young man, born and raised in obscurity, become such a globally-recognized figure for this cause?Born to George Thomas and Alice Rains Leland II in Lubbock, Texas in November of 1944, “Mickey,” as his maternal grandfather called him, was a third generation namesak...
Deacon Laurence: Guardian of the Church’s Treasures
May 25th, 2022
Brother Laurence (225-258) was one of seven deacons in the Early Church in Rome, in charge of the church’s treasures and the distribution of funds for the poor. But when Valerian took the throne and began persecuting Christians, hundreds died and serving the poor became more difficult. And when Valerian’s director of pagan religions demanded that Laurence turn over all of the church’s resources, L...
The Faces of Persecution: Resolve, Gratitude, and Joy
May 25th, 2022
Carlos is a friend of ours. He lives in Cuba. Every two or three weeks, he is summoned to the police station to be interrogated for his role as pastor in his city. Every day, he and others are followed, they have had phone and computer accounts tapped, their mail is read before they receive it, and their cell phones are confiscated when they arrive at the police station. Carlos sends out prayer re...
Georgian Baptists: Crossing Ancient Boundaries
October 25th, 2021
Could it be possible that a single church’s response of forgiveness in crisis turned an entire nation toward peace? The answer is yes, and a work not new to Malkhaz Songulashvili, who has led the Baptists of Georgia (former Soviet Republic) to model reconciliation in their war-ravaged nation for years. Generations of the Republic of Georgia’s citizens have lived through the World Wars, with their ...
Samuel Stearns and Roenna Clark Day: Founders of the “The Lone Star” Mission
October 25th, 2021
One bright day on 23 August 1835 in the village of Homer, New York, about thirty miles south of Syracuse, near Lake Ontario, a young bride greeted her soon-to-be husband, Samuel. They entered the little Homer church together to take their vows and began a legacy that has endured until the present day. The handsome young groom, Samuel Stearns Day, was born in a hamlet in Ontario, Canada, in 1808 to...
Belle the Beloved: Living Legend of the Lisu
October 25th, 2021
In March of 1901, a tiny girl-child was born to a Presbyterian lay preacher and his wife in Toronto, Canada. Her grandfather had been an ordained Presbyterian minister. Even so, with all of these generations of good models and devout home life, Belle did not know Jesus personally. She entered college, and her professor sneered at her belief in God and the Bible, proclaiming that no enlightened per...
The Wightmans: A Legacy of Generational Ministry
October 25th, 2021
Early in 1612, Edmund was arrested for preaching “that the baptizing of infants is an abominable custom; that the Lord’s supper and baptism are not to be celebrated as they are now practiced in the Church of England; and that Christianity is not wholly professed and preached in the Church of England, but only in part.” Later historians noted that “they found him guilty of many heresies, some of wh...
Dr. Ida Sophia Scudder: Physician, Healer, and Woman of Peace
October 25th, 2021
 Ida Sophia Scudder (December 9, 1870 – May 23, 1960) was born into the famous Scudder family. Her grandfather, Rev. Dr. John Scudder, Sr., had been the first American medical missionary, and had served as a doctor in Panditeripo, Ceylon, India with the Reformed Church in America. His seven sons, all born in India, became missionaries too. The youngest son, John Jr., married and soon became Ida’s ...
Thomas Paul, Extraordinary Leader Among Baptists
October 25th, 2021
Born and reared in the north as a free black during the Revolutionary War in America, Thomas Paul heard the cry for freedom. He became one of the most ardent supporters of “soul-liberty” that America has ever known. While all but forgotten today, the legacy of this pastor, church planter, abolitionist, and missionary, still echoes, both from pulpits and in the hearts of freedom-advocates across th...
Mildred Beatrice McWhorter: Houston’s Mother Theresa
March 31st, 2021
"Miss Mac," as she was affectionately known for most of her adult life, was born 26 June 1930 to Rev. Rufus Alexander and Stella Eley McWhorter, on her farm near Centralhatchee, Georgia. She attended school there, worked hard in the fields of her family’s cotton farm, and did heavy chores every day. She was a member of the Baptist church her father pastored and, when Mildred was thirteen, she real...
“Song of Peace” in “The Year Without Summer”
February 27th, 2021
Pastor Josef Mohr (1792-1848) was a December babe, born in Salzburg, Austria, where he was reared to love Christ and his Church. As a young man, he entered the seminary, where he was ordained in 1815. He then began to minister to the villagers in several hamlets nearby. His work was intense, for there was unending misery in those days.A string of volcanoes had been erupting in Asia for many years ...
Spafford and Bliss: Extended Tragedy, Eternal Hope
February 27th, 2021
In 1871, Horatio Spafford (1828-1888), a devout Presbyterian church elder and prosperous businessman, was living comfortably in Chicago with his wife Anna, and their four young daughters. At their home in a north side suburb, the Spaffords hosted and financially supported many guests. Horatio had been active in the abolitionist crusade and their cottage was a meeting place for activists in the ref...